Thinking about thinking – part 1

Peer Instruction has been getting rave reviews. Eric Mazur, a Harvard Professor of Physics, holds that learning proceeds at (up to) triple it’s normal rate!  And, with very little input from him… he’s even known students to feel it unfair that they’re doing all the work.

pi-workflowHow does it work?

  1. Students must do prep work before the their lesson
  2. There is a short opening plenary of 5 mins or so
  3. A probing ‘concept’ question is asked by the teacher
  4. Students must think on this by themselves
  5. After thinking, students then vote on the right answer – showing a distribution of responses – perhaps using a PRS or something like plickers.  The teacher does not give any indication which answer is correct.
  6. Now students can see the distribution of responses, and must next discuss – trying to convince each other.
  7. Finally and after discussion, students vote again.

Something to get you thinking: oddly enough, classes typically arrive at the right answer – why might that be?

Does it help learning?  When done correctly, repeated studies have shown a large effect size equal to moving your GCSE grade up an entire grade – e.g. from an A to an A*. Some studies show even greater gains.

But better than exam results,  Professor Mazur has show many other benefits too.  Communicating complex ideas, working in teams, developing flexibility in thinking and also a deep understanding of complex theories. Moreover, it’s fun.

 

For more information: https://blog.peerinstruction.net/

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